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Bedford County man who shot two in Ford-vs.-Chevy argument sentenced

Bedford County man who shot two in Ford-vs.-Chevy argument sentenced

A Bedford County man who shot two family members after an argument over the merits of car makers Ford versus Chevrolet in 2019 was sentenced Friday to a year behind bars.

Mark Edwin Turner faced two counts of malicious wounding, possessing a firearm as a nonviolent felon and using a firearm in a felony after wounding both his then-fiancée — now wife — Tracy Bailey and her son, Logan Bailey, with whom he argued heatedly over Ford vs. Chevy earlier that day during an Easter get-together.

According to testimony from Turner’s September 2019 trial in Bedford Circuit Court, as Bailey was saying goodbye to his mother the evening after the argument with Turner, Turner picked up the Ford vs. Chevy argument again. Turner stabbed Tracy Bailey, which Logan Bailey thought was a wound meant for him had his mother not been in the way, before Turner went into his house and returned with a gun. Turner then shot Logan Bailey in the arm and also shot Tracy Bailey. Both survived the wounds.

After spending more than two hours barricaded in his house while deputies with the Bedford County Sheriff’s Office negotiated with him, Turner was arrested.

Commonwealth’s Attorney Wes Nance said in Turner’s September 2019 trial that Turner appeared to be “heavily intoxicated” during the negotiations with law enforcement, and Bailey testified that he himself had about three beers, while Turner had been drinking “a good amount” of moonshine. Attorneys noted again on Friday that alcohol intoxication was a factor influencing all parties involved in the incident.

At Friday’s sentencing hearing, Turner’s defense attorney, Brad Lindsay, called six witnesses who testified on behalf of Turner, including Tracy Bailey, several of Turner’s neighbors, his landlord, and the Rev. Paul Jackson, who said he conducted Bible studies and counseling with Turner over the past two years since the incident. All witnesses said Turner expressed remorse for what he had done, and accepted full responsibility for his actions. Witnesses — including Turner himself — testified that since the incident, Turner had been sober, quitting alcohol cold-turkey.

Tracy Bailey called the incident an “accident,” adding her husband “punishes himself daily” for what happened, reminded of his actions by two bullet holes in their porch. Everyone had been drinking too much, and it all happened fast, she said.

Lindsay said over the past two years, during which Turner has been out on bond, Turner has been randomly tested for alcohol in his system nine times and passed every test.

“Words cannot express how sorry I am for what I’ve done,” Turner said before the court on Friday. “I cannot take back what happened that night… not a day goes by that I don’t wish I could.”

Lindsay pushed for a lighter sentencing for Turner, citing the testimony of witnesses, Turner’s proven good behavior and sobriety since the incident, that the shooting was not premeditated and was committed under the influence of intoxication, and health concerns that could complicate living in a jail, he said.

Nance said while he believed Turner was remorseful and had been sober since the incident, Turner’s actions in April 2019 were still “extreme” and “criminal” and endangered not only Turner’s loved ones but also the law enforcement officers who responded. He said consequences must be faced regardless.

Turner was sentenced to a 10-year term, to be suspended after 12 months in jail, followed by three years of supervised probation upon release. Good behavior for 10 years is also part of the sentence.

Additional conditions include Turner is to have no contact with Logan Bailey and will pay approximately $8,800 in restitution fees. Turner is also not to have access to firearms and is not to consume alcohol.

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